CHarles & Ray Eames X saber


Charles and Ray Eames were best known for their groundbreaking contributions to architecture, furniture design, industrial design and manufacturing, and the photographic arts. They created some of the most influential expressions of 20th century design in America, many of which remain stylish, fresh and functional today. The classic Eames Lounge Chair by Herman Miller inspired the Eames Saber in its use of molded plywood and leather. The handmade quality and attention to details were key elements we wanted to celebrate in the personalization of a hilt design.


Episode 2 : The Eames Saber
 

Credits: Pedal Born Pictures


Our Approach


DESIGN INSPIRATION

  • Purposeful
  • Quality
  • Timeless

Aesthetic Cues  |  mid-century modern, contour wrap detail, symmetry, mastery over materials

The Eames Saber was very much inspired by the Eames’ mastery over material and form, as evident in their work on the iconic Eames Lounge Chair made of plywood and leather. The high quality construction of the Eames Lounge Chair provided an intriguing idea to how we can translate the use of bent plywood and leather into a hilt design. Their exploration of materials also resonated deeply with how we approach design at Y Studios. We do a lot of upfront research on the appropriate application of color, material and finish in the design development of a product that would be production feasible and suitable for the user.

 Eames Molded Plywood Lounge Chair with Wood Base (1945) | Herman Miller

Eames Molded Plywood Lounge Chair with Wood Base (1945) | Herman Miller

 Eames Molded Plywood Dining Chair with Metal Base (1946) | Herman Miller

Eames Molded Plywood Dining Chair with Metal Base (1946) | Herman Miller

 Eames Lounge Chair and Ottoman (1956) | Herman Miller

Eames Lounge Chair and Ottoman (1956) | Herman Miller


COLORS, MATERIALS AND FINISHES (CMF)

DARK WARM PALETTE

Hilt  |  Walnut wood finish, cream or dark sable leather, black metal in satin finish or chrome metal finish

Plasma  |  Green
 

Process

Click to Enlarge

Back to Top


About Charles & Ray Eames
 


 

"What works is better than what looks good. The looks good can change, but what works, works." 

Ray Eames

 

Biography

Charles and Ray Eames were a husband and wife team whose unique synergy gave shape to America's 20th century. Their lives and work represented the nation's defining social movements: the West Coast's coming-of-age, the economy's shift from making goods to producing information, and the global expansion of
American culture.

The Eameses embraced the era's visionary concept of modern design as an agent of social change, elevating it to a national agenda. Combining imagination and thought, art and science, Charles and Ray Eames created some of the most influential expressions of 20th century design – furniture that remains stylish, fresh and functional today.

An ethos of functionalism informed all of their furniture designs. Charles and Ray Eames created more than a “look” with their bent plywood chairs or molded fiberglass seating. They had ideas about making a better world, one in which things were designed to fulfill the practical needs of ordinary people and bring greater simplicity and pleasure to our lives.

The Eameses are best known for their groundbreaking contributions to architecture, furniture design, industrial design and manufacturing, and the photographic arts. They pursued new ideas and forms with a sense of “serious fun.” Yet, it was rigorous discipline that allowed them to achieve perfection of form and mastery over materials. They loved their work, which was a combination of art and science, design and architecture, process and product, style and function.


FAMOUS WORK

The Eames House (1949), Eames Lounge Chair and Ottoman (1956), Eames Molded-Plywood Lounge Chair Wood (1945), DSR Chair (1948), La Chaise (1948), Wire Chair (1951)

 La Chaise (1948) | Vitra

La Chaise (1948) | Vitra

 DSR Molded Plastic Chair (1948) | Vitra

DSR Molded Plastic Chair (1948) | Vitra

 The Eames House, Case Study #8 (1949) | The Eames Foundation

The Eames House, Case Study #8 (1949) | The Eames Foundation